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Globex Properties

Courville Property - Gold
Courville Township, Quebec (NTS 32C/06)

Updated August 2018

 

Summary
The Courville property hosts 5km of volcanic-batholith contact within 20km of the prolific Val d’Or gold mining camp, in northern Quebec. At the eastern extremity of the Val d’Or camp, is the Peron district, where 3 mines and several deposits are contained in 6km of a similar volcanic-batholith environment.

A review of assessment work reveals 3 important facts: 1) the property contains several untested high priority IP targets; 2) a NE-SW trending structure that hosts 2 gold showings, has never been discussed; and 3) though most drilling is N-S, detailed mapping revels gold bearing dilation veins trend the same direction (see Figure 4 below).

Location - Access - Claim Description
The property is located approximately 75km NE of Val d’Or, Quebec in the Township of Courville, NTS 32C/06 (Figure 1). Access is made possible by all season gravel roads. The property consists of 39 claims in 2 blocks: a Central Block with 33 contiguous claims and a West Sector with 5 contiguous claims in one area and another isolated claim to the NW. Globex Mining Enterprises owns 100% interest in all the claims (1,622 Ha).

Location Map_2018-08-29

Geology
The Courville property property is situated in the south eastern part of the Archean Abitibi Greenstone Belt within 20km of the eastern edge of the Val d’Or mining camp (Figure 2). Rocks in the area belong to the Landrienne Formation of the Harricana Group. Volcanic rocks are primarily basalt and felsic pyroclastic breccia. The area is later intruded by the granodioritic Pascalis-Tiblemont batholith.

Regional Geology_2018-08-29

The property’s large Central Block, straddles approximately 5km of the northern contact of the batholith (Figure 3). This zone is characterized by interfingering intrusive and volcanic units. The geologic units are sub-parallel to the regional stratigraphy of WNW-ESE and are usually 2 to 30m in width.

Local Geology map_2018-08-29

Detailed mapping of a 50x25m stripped zone, 500m north of the property (Range III, lot 42, Parquet Zone A showing) by Corpomin Management in 1991 (Figure 4), clearly shows the tectonic framework for the area.  Gold bearing quartz veins are produced by a N-S dilation. The veins are preferentially located in more competent intrusive units. There are 6 intrusive units varying in thickness from 2 to 8 meters that contain quartz veins of 0.5 to 40cm in width.  They are identified in Figure 4 by Roman numeral I in the north and VI in the south. Note in Figure 4 how quartz veins stop once less competent volcanic rocks are intersected. Sulphide mineralization present is trace to 5% disseminated pyrite, with up to 10% in the wall rock. 

Gold values are greater in thicker veins and usually less than 1 g/t in wall rock. The highest gold value obtained in this stripping zone is 68.33 g/t in a channel sample of 0.3m, where the vein is 5-7cm thick ( Channel R62, GM 50466). The best composite intersection is 4.0 g/t Au over 2.3m (R23) and the longest one is 2.3 g/t Au over 9.6m (R16). 

The average grade of all channels sampled (410 samples totalling 235m) is 1.13 g/t (GM 50466 page 18 of the assay section). Though this value appears sub economic, the Canadian Malartic mine has an average grade of 1.08 g/t (2017 data from the Agnico Eagle website). Malartic was considered a high grade gold in quartz vein mining camp, until Osisko proved otherwise.

The N-S dilation veins are numerous and well developed within intrusive units that are only 2-8m wide. If these N-S structures intersected larger bodies, the resulting veins could conceivably be wider and more extensive. 

The Central Block of the Courville property contains a 5km interval of volcanic-batholith contact, where most of the rocks are mapped as intrusive. Given the detailed mapping described above is only 500m north of the property boundary, it is reasonable to assume this N-S structural regime, should persist into the Courville claims.

Figure 4

With this structural regime in mind, Figure 5, shows the outline of a highly resistive body, determined by IP. The geophysical report (GM 48214) defines this IP feature as “a late siliceous intrusive phase, probably located at the batholith edge”. This is therefore the contact of the volcanic package with the batholith. 

The geophysical report also identifies two Priority 1 IP anomalies J and G (250m and 500m long respectively), located on the northern margin of this interpreted batholith contact.  Because the geology trends ESE, anomalies J and G can be seen as an extension of the Swanson gold showing (described below). 

None of these Priority 1 IP anomalies were drill tested, even though this is the interpreted batholith - volcanic contact extending along strike from a known gold showing.  Considering the amount of gold in this region and proximity to the Val D’Or mining camp, it is more than surprising that none of these targets were drilled.

The West Sector containing 5 contiguous and 1 isolated claim, is underlain entirely by the Pascalis-Tiblemont batholith with the exception of a Proterozoic diabase dyke. The batholith in this area is composed mostly of tonalite to granodiorite with lenses of diorite and quartz diorite.

Figure 5

Mineralization
There are are numerous showings on the property (Figure 3) that are directly or indirectly related to the Manneville fault, its associated shears and the Pascalis-Tiblemont batholith-volcanic contact. They are as follows:

Swanson (Parquet) (Lot 42, Range II-III)
The Swanson (Parquet) showing is located at the edge of the Pascalis-Tiblemont batholith, centered on the baseline at L56+00W. Mineralization is hosted mostly in shears developed along geologic contacts that trend WNW-ESE and dip steeply to the NE. However inspection of Figure 6 (a Placer Dome compilation GM 51058) reveals a continuous panel of gold intersections trending NE-SW. Mineralization is fine disseminated pyrite (up to 10%) with local chalcopyrite and occasionally, visible gold in quartz-calcite-tourmaline veins. Of the numerous historic drill intersections, some highlights are as follows: 6.7 g/t Au over 1.5m in PC-10; 2.0 g/t over 3.8m and 4.4 g/t over 1.5m both in PC-09; 4.5 g/t over 1.8m in PC-25; 15.8 g/t over 0.3m in PC-29; and 1.2 g/t over 5.6m in PC-30. 

Note that gold intersections in holes PC-29 – 10 – 09 – 30, are a continuous NE-SW panel, where PC-29 is in the NE and PC-30 in the SW.  This continuous panel is 100m long and has the same trend as Parquet Zone SE - H discussed below.  Note also that the two PC-09 gold intersections of 3.8m and 1.5m could have been a single 5.3m intersection, but were interrupted a diorite dyke.  Further drilling on this 100m panel is needed.

Figure 6

Parquet Zone SE (lot 48, Range II) and Parquet Zone H (lot 44, Range II)
Considered as separate showings in government files, inspection of a Placer Dome compilation (GM 51058) revels they are different ends of the same 1km long mineralized gold structure trending NE-SW (Figure 7). Of the 32 holes that define this structure, all but 2 intersect gold mineralization. Some intersections are low grade but wide and others are high grade and narrow. Several combinations of intersections can be compiled into panels 50 to 100m wide. This structure is open at both ends and to depth.

It is interesting to note that, though this orientation of deformation is observed in the detailed stripping 500m north of the property, it is only present as thin dry failures (Figure 5). As evidenced by the Swanson and Parquet Zones SE and H, this orientation in the batholith is much more significant. 

Numerous historical gold intersections are encountered along the entire length of this 1km structure. Some of the better ones are: 124.4 g/t Au over 0.3m in PC-23; 2.6 g/t over 2.4m in PC-26; 1.4 g/t over 4.0m in PC-27; 10.2 g/t over 0.5m in PC-46; 7.0 g/t over 1.6m in PC-76;  3.4 g/t over 3.8m in PC-38 and 4.0 g/t over 1.2m in PC-15. 

Beauchemin Showing (lots 33-34, range III)
This showing includes two zones referred to as zones #3 and #4. Zone #3 is made up of quartz veins found in ESE trending shear zones cutting dioritic rock.  Secondary minerals in the veins include carbonate, epidote and/or chlorite as well as pyrrhotite, chalcopyrite and galena. Results obtained by drilling are:  drill hole C68-9 with 7.83 g/t Au over 1.52m, including 14.74 g/t Au over 0.61m. Zone #4 is found in a felsic dyke, several dozen metres wide and oriented ESE  which obliquely transects a quartz diorite. An ESE trending shear zone containing auriferous quartz veins with tourmaline, pyrite, pyrrhotite, chalcopyrite and galena occupies the centre of the dyke.

Canspar (lot 33, Range III)
The Canspar showing consists of a quartz-calcite-epidote stockwork with trace to 1% pyrite hosted by a brecciated fine grained micro diorite and a gabbro.  Some of the historic gold intersections are: 3.13 g/t Au over 0.7m in CV-96-04; and 1.0 g/t over 1.0m in CV-96-03.

C2-A showing
This showing consists of 1-2% disseminated pyrite in quartz carbonate veins hosted in diorite. Historic gold intersections are: 2.4 g/t over 0.9m in CO-92-03 and 2.4 g/t over 0.3m. 

Figure 7

Conclusions - Recommendation
The Courville property contains 5km of volcanic-batholith contact within 20km of a similar environment in the prolific gold mining camp of Val d’Or Quebec. When one considers a 6km interval of volcanic-batholith contact, in the Peron District of the Val d’Or, is capable of hosting 3 mines and several deposits, the importance of the Courville property becomes apparent. 

The location of this volcanic-batholith contact has been determined by an IP survey (Figure 5) where the geophysicist interprets a highly resistive body to be “a late siliceous intrusive phase that probably represents the volcanic-batholith contact”. Coincident with this interpreted contact is the historic Swanson gold showing at the NW end and two Priority 1 IP anomalies J and G trending along geologic strike toward the SE. Though anomalies J and G (250 and 500m long, respectively) are coincident with both the interpreted batholith-volcanic contact and a historic gold showing, none of these targets were drilled. 

Most of the Swanson historic mineralization occurs in shear zones hosted by geologic contacts trending NW-SE, but inspection of a plan map, shows a 100m long panel that trends NE-SW (Figure 6). This orientation is also the trend of the Parquet SE and H zones. Some of the gold values in this panel are: 6.7 g/t Au over 1.5m in PC-10; 2.0 g/t over 3.8m and 4.4 g/t over 1.5m both in PC-09; 4.5 g/t over 1.8m in PC-25; 15.8 g/t over 0.3m in PC-29; and 1.2 g/t over 5.6m in PC-30. 

The Parquet SE - H zone, is a 1km long mineralized gold structure trending NE-SW (Figure 7). Of the 32 holes that define this structure, all but 2 intersect gold mineralization. Several combinations of intersections can be compiled into panels 50 to 100m wide. This structure is open at both ends and to depth.  Some of the gold values are: 124.4 g/t Au over 0.3m in PC-23; 2.6 g/t 0ver 2.4m in PC-26; 1.4 g/t over 4.0m in PC-27; 10.2 g/t over 0.5m in PC-46; 7.0 g/t over 1.6m in PC-76; 3.4 g/t over 3.8m in PC-38 and 4.0 g/t over 1.2m in PC-15. 

It is interesting to note that, though this NE - SW orientation of deformation is observed in the detailed stripping 500m north of the property, it is only present as thin dry failures (Figure 5). As evidenced by the Swanson and Parquet SE – H showings, this orientation in the batholith, is much more significant for gold mineralization and needs to be explored. 

Another important feature of the property, is the presence of N-S dilation structures that generate gold bearing quartz veins in competent rocks. This observation was made as a result of detailed mapping, 500m north of the property. Competent units are 2-8m wide and the N-S dilation generates gold veins 0.5 to 40cm wide.  

Given this stripped area is only 500m north of the property boundary, it is relatively safe to assume the structural regime will persist into the Courville claims. It is also expected the resulting N-S dilation should generate larger veins in a batholith than an 8m wide sill. 

Given the above findings, it appears obvious that the Priority 1 IP targets J and G need to be drilled. What is not obvious is the direction of drilling. There are 3 important orientations on the property that need to be considered: 1) the NE-SW trend; 2) the ESE trending geologic contact shears; and 3) the N-S dilation zones. With these 3 orientations in mind, it appears the optimum drilling direction should be about NNW to SSE. 

It is also suggested that before any drilling be undertaken, a new IP survey over anomalies J and G be performed. Ideas and techniques have changed since the last survey in 1988. Lines orientated N-S would monitor mineralization at geologic contacts and select E-W lines could be chosen to look for quartz filled dilation zones.


 

 

 

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